Santa Rosa Maker Faire

And I hope to see you there! I’m so happy and excited to be exhibiting at the Santa Rosa Maker Faire. My friend Mimi Luebberman will be there as well and I hope we can have our booths together. My friend Gina will be join me and we will bring my carder for onsite carding demonstrations. I don’t have my booth number, but make sure you will look for me if you are planning to visit. It seems that we will have great weather for the weekend.

Saturday 19 October 2013  10:00–4:00 Wells Fargo Center for the Arts

The Faire will be held at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts and the directions are as follow:

50 Mark West Springs Road

Santa Rosa, CA 95403

Do you need a map to get there? Click this link:

Patricia

Lamb Day Windrush Farm’s Spring Fiber Day

 

Come spend a day on the farm spinning, knitting, and visiting… May 5th, 10am to 4pm

We will also have…

  • Farm Tours

  • 11am Shearing of hoggit fleeces

  • Wood-fired pizzas for sale

  • Fleece and fiber sales

  • Sale of used spinning wheels

    Come on out, no reservations necessary.

    2263 Chileno Valley, Rd., Petaluma, CA 94952

    (707) 775-3390

     

My last show of the year

Art by the water

Holiday Craft Fair

I wanted to do one more show this year, but I didn’t feel like driving anywhere and get into the frenzy of getting ready for one more craft show (don’t get me wrong, because I like doing craft fairs), but wanted to do something special and what a better way to do it surrounded by my friends who share the same interests when it comes to crafts, food and community. So my last show will be held here at home. If you feel like driving to Bolinas, my doors will be open and I will have a booth set up with my fiber and finished garments. It will be sort of an open studio, except that I will be joined by my friends with their own booths selling their hand made crafts. If you feel hungry, my friend Mirta will be offering her delicious Mexican food, so come and support handmade!

Directions:

If you need directions you please use this link. 

Please feel free to bring your spinning wheel or spindle if you feel like. There is a nice size deck where we can accommodate spinners if the weather permits.

Vendors:

Gina Alexander – Hand spun yarn, baby items

Charmaine Krieger – Hand spun yarn, hand knitted accessories

Erica Hawley – Baby items

Karen Dibblee – Jewelry Artist

Alejandra Bryant – Jewelry

Marlie de Swart – Fiber Arts

Patricia Briceño – Beesybee Fibers and jewelry

Linda Samuels – Beaded Jewelry

Sophie Webb – Prints, books, original paintings

Mirta Guzman- Food and drinks

I hope you can make it, we will be there rain or shine,

Patricia

Fall is here…

And the rainy season is just starting. It is time to start thinking about what to plant for the year to come. A couple of years ago, while visiting Guatemala, I noticed that the weavers use a plant to dye cotton called Pericon (Tagetes lucida) that yields a yellow color.  I was able to find the seeds at Seed Savers Exchange. I learned that here,  in the US, the herb is called Sweet Mace, Mexican Tarragon or Texas Tarragon. After doing some research online I found out that it is a medicinal plant too, great for treating stomach aches. The funny thing is that my interest in knowing more about this plant started actually with my need to mitigate a stomach ache I had a couple of weeks ago.  I recalled getting a tea blend (for digestion) from a Tz’utujil women’s cooperative in San Juan La Laguna, located near the Lake Atitlan. I want to mention that this town was one of the cleanest places I’ve seen in Guatemala.

And so, I decided to give the tea a try, with happy results. Fortunately, the tea came with a label with all the ingredients written on it. Peppermint, Sweet Mace, Lemon Verbena and Lemon Grass. I will be able to recreate my own blend from now on, (because it tastes yummy too) since the ingredients are easily accessible. And as soon as I get the plants going, I’ll use it for dyeing wool too.

And talking about plants, earlier this year I planted some indigo, but they did very poorly. I’m guessing that the reason was the lack of warm weather in my area. I have decided to let them seed this year and see what happens next year. I’m enjoying watching the finches eat the seeds, and hoping that they will leave some for my next crop. I can’t wait to start experimenting with my indigo plants. I didn’t suspect that it was going to take a couple of years to do it.

Meanwhile, I’ve been busy spinning, and washing my fleeces that I got at the Dixon Wool Fair a month ago. I got two beautiful Romney fleeces from Wyammy Ranch located near Occidental. I also got an alpaca fleece from Valhalla Farms that I can’t wait to wash.

 

I think I will have plenty to do this winter;  fiber-wise. And now, some pictures of my latest handspun:

This batt is very special, because I got it from Lorah, that visited during the Fiber Fest at Windrush Farm. It was very generous of her to give me a couple of them. It was very pleasant to spin it. I wish I had better pictures of the batt, because it has gorgeous gold sparkles. I enjoyed talking to her about Peru, and the wonderful weaving and spinning tradition that this country has. She is one of the lucky people who has gone to the Gathering of Weavers organized by Nilda Callanaupa Alvarez, author of Weaving in the Peruvian Highlands.

 

I also ha a lot of fun spinning this hand pulled roving…

And for some reason, it reminds me of a bird’s nest…

And today’s project…

Super Yummy Soft Merino that I dyed in blues and pinks… And now, back to my spinning wheel…

Re-skilling

I’m excited to let you know that I will be teaching a Felting workshop at the Regenerative Design Institute on October 31st as part of their Re-skilling Series.

Re-skilling is a term used by the Transition Town Movement to revive the art of traditional craftsmanship. As we transition away from global consumerism and towards localized, earth friendly economies, we need to reclaim these skills for ourselves and for our community. Beyond just providing for our personal or family needs, these essential skills can provide the basis for emerging cottage industries that can revitalize the local economy with genuinely “green” principles and technologies.

Re-skilling requires that we connect more deeply to the natural world. It involves cultivating (or foraging) plants for basketry, building materials, medicine, general body care, dyes, food and clothing. It invites us into a closer relationship with domestic and wild animals, and asks that we pay more attention to the changing of the seasons and the cycles of the natural world. It also fosters a deeper gratitude for all that nature continues to provide us.

Workshops will focus on hands-on learning, and will include topics like fiber arts, rustic furniture making, soap-making, herbal medicine, mushroom cultivation, and more. This fall, RDI will be hosting several fiber arts workshops – the first in a series on how to transform raw local materials into beautifully hand-crafted clothing. Read more about the Re-skilling Series and the Fiber Arts workshops.