Easy Felted Scarf

Nuno Felted Scarf

I promised that I would post a photo tutorial and show how I use my Merino Wool Blends to felt a scarf. This is a fun, easy and fast project. Almost instant gratification. What I like about working with these blends, is that it is not necessary to purchase several colors of wool to make a multi color scarf, like the one shown in the picture, which can become quite expensive. Also, storage can be a problem for most of us. One braid of 4 oz can probably be enough to make a couple scarves. The tops are already blended, just the right amount, so the colors don’t muddy up once they are felted. They are great for beginners, since one doesn’t need a big investment on materials to make a couple of scarfs.Forest Jewels

For this particular scarf I used the Forest Jewels colorway (which is a blend of Merino with Soy Silk) for the front, and for the background I decided to used Merino in the Eggplant color which are both available at my shop. I also used a template for guidance, olive oil soap, bubble wrap and a pool noodle to be able to roll the project.Material used

I also found in my stash, some fun pieces of fabric and some dyed locks to add as decoration. This is a great way to use bits and pieces of fabric remnants from past projects.

Laying it out

Start by laying your bubble wrap with the bubbles facing up. Next, measure and break apart a portion of the roving needed, leaving some room for the shrinking process to occur. Forest Jewels roving

Carefully and with patience, start by opening the wool as shown below. Make sure that the fibers stay in a vertical position.

Here you can play with the design by leaving some holes on purpose if you want some of the background layer to show. It’s like making rivers of colors.Opening the rovingKeep opening the roving until you reach the size of your template if you are using one. I usually have one just because I don’t feel like measuring all the time.Scarf Tutorial

As you can see in the picture, I left a few holes, but I kept moving the colors around a little. This is the fun part for me. One important note: I usually work my way from the front to the back, meaning that I lay my materials facing away from me.

Laying out

Once I’m happy with how it looks, I move into laying out the background color, in which this case I used Merino in Eggplant.

Laying out the background

For this particular project, I also added some fun crinkle silk gauze at the edge of the scarf. If you add some fabric, make sure to sandwich it between your front layer and the background to secure it. Once I feel that I’m done with the design, the next step to follow is to wet the entire project with soapy water.Rolling the project

Now is the time to roll the project. I’m not going to go deep here, because there are many tutorials on YouTube to do this. But I usually do 12 min. on each end. After rolling from both ends, it is important to check and see if the fibers are already felting. If not, then it will be necessary to repeat the rolling stage again. Once you see that there is some felting happening, the last step will be the fulling which consists of throwing the project against a hard surface… like your floor. But before doing this, it is useful to get rid of excess water, otherwise, you will be splashing water and soap just about everywhere. I usually go outside on the deck to do this. Be cautious when doing this because here is where the scarf will shrink even more and faster. Keep checking the size constantly.

Once you are done with the fulling, make sure to always rinse your felted projects in water with vinegar and hang your piece to let it dry. I like to press my scarves to give them a nice finish.Finished Scarves

Sequins

Here is how the Soy Silk looks after it has been felted into the wool. It forms nice wiggles on the surface. Soy Silk

Crinkled Silk Gauze sandwiched between the two layers of wool.Crinkle Silk Gauze

The wool locks add color and texture.Wool Locks

This was a fun project! I think I will be working with the next color which is called Peacock. I will definitely post more pics.

Patricia

Celebrating The Year of The Sheep!

I’m getting ready for the Second Annual Farm to Home Wool Festival at Valley Ford hosted by Ariana and Casey. Last year we had a blast. We got lot’s of visitors, the weather was great, and the food was to die for. This year they will have demonstrations on shearing, weaving, spinning, music and more. This is a great family friendly event and the driving to get there is really nice.

Wool Festival Banner

I will be having a booth selling my hand dyed fibers and such along with other vendors offering their wares.

BLT

This is a FREE EVENT!

Free Event

Venue

Valley Ford Wool Mill
Phone:
707-876-1908
14390 Highway 1, Valley Ford, CA 94972 United States
 
+ Google Map
Website:
http://valleyfordwoolmill.com
Patricia

Art by the Water – Recapitulation

We did it again! Our Second “Art by the Water” event was a success once again. The food cooked by my friend Mirta was as always, delicious. She made mole negro with chocolate sauce. Yum! And my friends and I had a great time hanging out together and with our visitors. I got to “unveiled” my latest felt work, which is always fun explaining people about the process. Thanks everyone (patrons and artists) for making this event every year more and more fun and for all your help. And now, it’s picture time…

Pauline's Soap

Pauline's Soap

Hats

Felting by Patricia

Knits by Erica and Gina

Weavings

Quilt by Erica

Hat rack

Hats by Patricia

Face creams by Lee

Yarn by Charmaine

Knits by Barbara

Our favorite visitor

Fair

Patricia

Getting some spinning done

I’ve been trying to get caught up with my spinning. This is my “Tuscany” SW Merino:

SW Merino

SW Merino

This is from my last SAL “Alice in Wonderland”. I want to knit a pair of socks with this yarn, and my goal has been to spin fingering weight yarn. This is the first skein of two and right now I’m working on the second skein.

SW Merino

SW Merino

YARN SPECS: Sw Merino

2 ply

2 oz

190 yards

Fingering weight

13 wpi

Patricia

Lamb Day Windrush Farm’s Spring Fiber Day

 

Come spend a day on the farm spinning, knitting, and visiting… May 5th, 10am to 4pm

We will also have…

  • Farm Tours

  • 11am Shearing of hoggit fleeces

  • Wood-fired pizzas for sale

  • Fleece and fiber sales

  • Sale of used spinning wheels

    Come on out, no reservations necessary.

    2263 Chileno Valley, Rd., Petaluma, CA 94952

    (707) 775-3390

     

Knitting with local wool

I’ve been itching to knit something using this new yarn that I bought a couple months ago. I felt that a shrug would be very appropriate since the weight of the yarn (fingering) seemed light enough for a pattern with an easy lace stitch. Easy peasy… Twirl yarn is made with local wool (Napa Valley) from the sheep of Mary Pettis-Sarley and dyed using local plants. How cool is that! Check out my palette: Twirling Moona (CVM-Merino), Rudus (sp) Calcyanoides (CVM), and French Toast.

I was able to knit this in week in a half, which for me, it is really fast, considering that I’m a slooooow knitter.

I will put it all together sometime tonight. It was definitely a fun knit.

Take care,

Lambtown USA

Mark your calendars!

I will be vending this year at the Dixon Fiber Festival. Boot # 65. Come and say hi and meet my products in person. This is a great opportunity to visit a great variety of vendors that offer from raw fleeces to already processed fiber, ready to be spun. There will be demonstrations, classes “sheep to shawl” competitions and more.

The Dixon Lambtown is an annual festival celebrating the rich agriculture and lamb industry of the local region.  The festival will be held at The Dixon May Fair Grounds, 655 South 1st St., Dixon. Click here for a map.  Just an hour away from San Francisco.

We are also trying to beat the Guinnese Book of World Records record for the most knitters knitting in one place at one time. So, if you are planning to attend, please bring your knitting needles and help to break the record, we need 1200 knitters to knit at the same time for 15 minutes.

I hope to see you!

Navajo Ply goes wild…

I’ve been very inspired with Navajo plying lately and I’m finding that the possibilities are endless. The whole process is really fun. It can be a little bit daunting, and this is because you have to build your dexterity before you are happy with the results, but once you get the hang out of it,  it can be easy and fun to use this plying technique, and it gives you a lot of room for creativity. The first time I tried it I got all tangled up with the loops, and my chains were showing too much. I wasn’t fast enough at grabbing the next section of yarn to be plied, and at the same time, I wasn’t holding the plied section properly to control the twist. After all, I only have two hands! Well, a few attempts later, I started to see the results. Here is some yarn that I spun with a some CVM roving that Yolo Mill processed it for me.

Specs:

CVM

 Navajo Ply

Aran Weight

10 wpi

Of course, once you learn the rules, you are allowed to break them. Here is Navajo ply gone wild:

The wpi is 1 to 1.5.

Here is another yarn that I made with some Merino I got from Yarnival:

I can’t wait to try these yarns on some weaving or crocheting. This stuff is addictive! I just want to try more with different fibers and textures. The ideas are pouring!

Yarnival in pictures… and a few words.

I’m ready to start my week after being away for a few days. Yarnival was a lot of fun! The location itself was beautiful. My booth was nestled amongst pear tress and big redwoods. The weather was hot enough for me and everyone around was excited and happy to be at the event. I met several people there, some were spinners, knitters, farmers, vendors, and those that are genuinely appreciative of the work we do, but for the most important part, we all were there to have a good time.

And I’m not kidding when I say having a good time!

The carding station

These masks were incredible!

This is Lexi’s Studio which was dedicated to showcase the work of several fiber artists that were featured at the fair. Some of them came from Japan specially to attend the event.

This is the famous giant skein. This is one 10.5 mile long strand of yarn comprised of individual sections spun by different spinners from around the globe. My yarn is somewhere in there!

Lexi giving her lecture about art yarn.

My wheel

Hopefully I’ll be able to attend again, next year.